Category Archives: mile high fence

This week in pictures

Love this time of year-though today starts a heat wave.  Not so in love with this new world order…I expect to spend the next two days working in the cool of the early morning as long as I can, and then hiding from the sun except for moving irrigation.  Be safe, stay hydrated!

 

elk fence on main garden!

elk fence on main garden!

calendula with bad guy

calendula with bad guy

eggplant flower

eggplant flower

sugar magnolia pea

sugar magnolia pea

bulb fennel

bulb fennel

pullets on pasture

pullets on pasture

terraces for the orchard

terraces for the orchard

Earth work

Terraces are in and look amazing!

Imageterraces tilled by husband with borrowed tractor…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbeds built by hand and amended with compost….a bcs with a rotary hoe would make this go much faster.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbeds limed, amended with micronutrients and shaped

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAfirst beds planted and irrigation lines in place-wait, what is that in the distance? Hmmm, think I know what the next big project is…..

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAbut enough boring pictures of dirt and thousand pound ungulates-that’s a herd of 30 or so cow elk on the hillside there….here is some spring veggie porn-

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand a new wildflower discovery-I think this is an orchid called Candystick

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand this is a sight for my sore eyes-our Portland house is all spruced up and on the market!  I get to spend an entire day on the farm today without going into town to paint, fix or clean-what a luxury!  Wish us a speedy drama free sale.

fish art not included

fish art not included

cheers!

The farm ate my blog post

Busy Busy Busy…..

Here are some pics from the late winter/early spring.  We are just getting into the thick of things-our earthmoving guy comes tomorrow to terrace the hillside where the main gardens and orchards will go!  Super exciting.  The new greenhouse works fabulously-one of my jobs for today is to get the prop cabinet up and running-time to start tomatoes!  Got the onions and greens going-bottom heat for the onions and the greens don’t need anything other than the greenhouse protection and warmth….here’s some Arugula. A little leggy probably due to the big fluctuations in temperature from night to day (downside of a small greenhouse)-but they are in the ground now and doing well!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABaby bunnies are growing fast-hope to have some more on the way soon…..

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd these girls are almost old enough to add to the breeding program….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe shuksan strawberries are coming along….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy kind neighbor came down with his tractor and tilled up the lower garden for me-long term plan is this is where the perennials and berries will be, also some of the orchard trees (cider apples perhaps?  or Pears).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Dingo – aka My Six Strong Men or MSSM-has been awesome for amending the beds once I built them (by hand with a shovel-some day I will have one of these).  Also for setting posts for the deer and elk fence-yet to be installed but coming soon to a farm near you!

We have for the most part been having freakishly warm weather both outside and in.  You can definitely heat a 4 bdrm house with a wood fired furnace!

too hot for me, but minnesotan husbands love it

too hot for me, but minnesotan husbands love it

The unusual weather is more than a little worrisome-will summer be hot and dry dry dry?  Or cool and wet as mild dry winters in the PNW usually indicate? More kale?  Or more peppers?  Hmmmmm.  Anyway, any sun at this time of year is greatly appreciated-it has been a gorgeous late winter/early spring.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

worlds most beautiful field mower IMHO

worlds most beautiful field mower IMHO

Hope you have some fair weather to enjoy where-ever you are!  Cheers-

Busy bees

Here is what we have been up to, not much farming but the fall rains are coming and we need to get the house in shape to live in safely… to prep for the electrician (complete rewire) and the plumber (complete replumb) we pulled trim and cut the lath and plaster at 40″ from the floor throughout the house.  Then we hired an amazing demo crew to come in and demo out the basement, the loft floor in the barn, and all the lath and plaster below our cut.  This will enable the electrician to get in and pull wire quickly, we also got a good look at the framing of the house (which looks amazing for 90 yrs old!), and made sure nothing else was living in walls besides the bees.  And we got those out too-took over a week and I almost got heat exhaustion, but it is done!  Oh, and we built a new set of stairs in the barn.

this fireplace is actually soapstone or marble painted to look like mahogany....it is a pretty good tromp l'oeil!

this fireplace is actually soapstone or marble painted to look like walnut….it is a pretty good trompe l’oeil!

found this beautiful floor under some gross linoleum in the bedroom with the bee closet.  I think we will clear coat and keep it as is.

found this beautiful floor under some gross linoleum in the bedroom with the bee closet. I think we will clear coat and keep it as is.

new barn stairs!

new barn stairs!

scary basement now significantly less scary...and we find out today hopefully if this old wood furnace is still useable...

scary basement now significantly less scary…and we find out today hopefully if this cool old wood furnace is still useable…

Huge huge thanks to Der Lovett deconstruction…they did a beautiful job with the demo and left everything spotless, and finished the house the basement and the barn in something like 14 hours.  They were awesome.  Now we are working on digging a ditch to the equipment shed for power, and hopefully if I get a chance building a colony for the rabbits…who do not seem to ever tire of blackberry canes for breakfast.  And did I mention?  Mustangs love thistles.  And generate a wheelbarrow full of ‘soil amendment’ every day while mowing. 

We have chickens!

We fixed up the old coop and moved in about 20 hens of various breeds and ages…although several of the pullets are turning out to be cockerels…a good opportunity to go visit Mineral Springs Poultry in a few weeks.  Next we start to tackle the house!

 

coop remodel complete!

coop remodel complete!

Complete with outdoor dining area....

Complete with outdoor dining area….

coop interior

coop interior

first farm eggs

first farm eggs

It is so nice to have hens again….and eggs!

 

 

Letting the horse out before you buy the barn door….

Or something like that.  This beautiful creature trotted into my life last week.  Here she is fresh off the trailer from eastern Oregon:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAShe is a wild mustang from the BLM corrals in Burns, Oregon.  She was gathered from the Paisley Desert HMA in southeastern Oregon sometime last fall, probably.  I have found a local trainer that gentles mustangs, who is going to gentle her and give her a couple more months of saddle training (and I will get some training too).  To say this is a dream come true is an understatement, but I wouldn’t have dared to do it if I hadn’t met Rachel (the trainer) who trains about a mile from the Bunion, and her amazing little mare Ember, that she trained for a Mustang Million competition over the winter.  I actually bid on that mare in the post event auction, but when she went to someone else Rachel and I cooked up our current plan, to adopt a wild horse through the TIP program, and have Rachel get her saddle broke and gentled for me. Here is one of the pictures of her I saw ‘shopping’ online…photo credit Beverly Shaffer:

burns corralsIt is not for everyone, picking a wild horse from a website and committing to it, but I have been interested in mustangs for a while for several reasons.  #1, I may not know her temperament beforehand, but I will know that my horse has a fantastic start with a great trainer, and the bulk of her interactions with humans will have been very positive.  In short, I get a horse with no baggage.  #2, mustangs have actually been subjected to environmental pressures and natural selection in typically pretty harsh environments.  The result is a sturdy horse with great hooves, good resistance to disease and parasites, good conformation, and that is an easy keeper.  #3, Horses in the wild have to live together in herds to survive, so mustangs tend to be well adjusted and good citizens with other horses.  #4 Genetic diversity.  Except for perhaps the Kiger herd near Steens Mountain, most HMA’s are a hodgepodge of horse genetics, which I like (though the Kigers with their primitive markings are beautiful too).  Some folks are biased against ‘mutts’, but growing up surrounded by the thoroughbred industry, I’ve seen the advantages of hybrid vigor and the disadvantages of inbreeding.  I grew up in Kentucky, and had my own horse from the age of 9, and I have wanted another ever since I sold him to go to college.  Plus I am the type of person that adopts dogs from the pound.  We don’t own the farm quite yet, so this is a little bit of a gamble, but with 3 months of training down the road I think the timing will work out.  What does a mustang saddle horse have to do with the farm?  Well, even farmers have to have fun once in a while, and I figure I can either pay for compost and amendments, or I can buy some hay and trace minerals and keep my own beautiful manure maker on the grass we grow ourselves.  She seems to be very level headed so far, so she may even be a good candidate for some harness work.  Time will tell.  I have named her Osprey.  She is gorgeous, very spanish looking, with lots of neck and mane and a tail that drags on the ground.

Want to know more about adopting a mustang?  There are thousands of horses in BLM corrals all over the west and midwest seeking adoption (wild burros too).  There are adoption events and competitions nationwide, and you can adopt and have a horse shipped to you almost anywhere, if you are willing to be patient and creative.  To find out more, go to the Mustang Heritage Foundation website.  There are horses up regularly for adoption at the BLM corrals,I think the newest auction opens tomorrow, April 1st.  Another place to find information on adoptable mustangs is the Modern Mustanger Facebook page.  You can also see more about the Mustang Million events in the recent movie, Wild Horse, Wild Ride.  Rachel is currently training a Murderer’s Creek gelding named Titan, who may be the sweetest horse I have ever met.  He will compete and be up for auction at the Extreme Mustang Makeover event in Norco, California in mid May.  He is also beautiful, built like a mini Friesian, all black with long legs.

mare 2270Look at that face!  I haven’t been this happy and in love since my wedding day.  :).