Tag Archives: weather

Hi Everybody!

Remember me?  I had this blog, and then I bought this farm, and then, and then and then….well, I am back. Let’s just say I am glad 2016 is in the rear view mirror.

 

So much has happened in the last year, including a big life reality check that put a hitch in all of my giddyups, including this blog.  But we survived, and all is well for now. And boy am I grateful for every sweet farmy day.  I need to go pot up peppers, but here’s a quick overview of what is happening on the farm, headed into year 3!

I went morel hunting, and finding!  This really is an R rated mushroom. But delicious-we made morel/nettle/bacon pizza.

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On the farm I started experimenting with occultation a la Jean Martin Fortier, a la french intensive gardening.  Very happy with the results so far, including being able to work up some beds in spite of the relentless, never ending, ceaseless, continual rain.  Is it raining right now?  Yes, yes it is.  Heck, people on the East side of the Cascades are complaining about the lack of sun.  Like they even know…..

IMG_0607.JPGLeft to right-prepped and planted terrace, terrace with amendments but no compost (it is there at the end of the bed), terrace whose tarp has just been removed and then rotoharrowed, then a terrace that has just been mowed and covered with the tarp.  This process seems to take about a month to 5 weeks in winter, I expect that to shorten down to two or three weeks in summer, when soil biology is more active.  I have high hopes this will reduce weed pressure significantly.

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I am also hoping this tarp process will help me incorporate cover cropping into my rotations-here is a bed I seeded this spring with the intent to let it bloom and grow all summer and then prep using the tarps for fall crops.

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As my soil improves I can plant more intensively so I can actually take some terraces and beds out of production for a while-and I am changing my methods away from row cropping and more towards intensive planting.  Growing things with a shorter turn around time also helps me keep ahead of the gophers, though I am seriously considering introducing some gopher snakes to the farm. I had to replant almost all of my garlic, and I built a screened bottom bed just for that purpose.  But it isn’t big enough-I should have at least twice as much garlic as this.  IMG_0625.jpgSigh.  Moving on….the greenhouse is awesome.  So awesome I went nuts and planted a bunch of stuff that has matured 3 weeks early.  Oops!  Well, consider this research into season extension and a possible future Shoulder Season CSA.   Call me if you want lettuce.

P4097916.JPGIMG_0632.jpgHope everyone out there in blog land is healthy and happy!  If you want to know more about the farm and what we are up to-head over to the farm website:

 

cheers!

 

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New Year. Resolution.

First we had 30 straight days and 21 inches of rain on the orchard terraces (and everything else)….then clear and frost on the beet greens,

frosty beeet

frosty beet

now, snow on the wheelbarrow.

 

time to muck...

time to muck…

This is supposed to turn to ice later-maybe we have enough elevation to miss out on the ice and just get more snow….

In spite of the rain the terraces have all held up well-I did a bunch of civil engineering to get water to drain and spread out along the terraces in both directions.  The baby trees all seem to be in good shape.

I also graveled Osprey’s roundpen/sacrifice area, and boy has that been a godsend in this weather.  No mud!  None!  And picking out is like cleaning a giant litter box.  It was not cheap but worth every penny, and the horse appreciates not surfing around on slimy mud all winter long.

roundpen footing

round pen footing

The pen is graded away from the barn, and the barn got gutters this summer. Then I put down road fabric which keeps the mud out of the rock so it lasts longer, 4 inches of 3/4 minus gravel, and 2 inches of 1/4 ten (‘turkey grit’) on top of that.  The grit sized gravel acts more like sand but is safer for the horse-she is less likely to eat it and get sand colic.

We finally got our wood burning insert installed in the house-we are as cozy as cozy can be.  It is a Lopi stove-burns cleaner than a pellet stove and takes a big piece of wood-24″.  We also have minisplits to keep the house warm if we leave town or don’t want to build a fire-and the stove will keep us toasty if the power goes out.  We took one chimney down to the roof line and had the other one lined.  Next for the house is a new metal roof.

bring on the wing chair...and a good book!

bring on the wing chair…and a good book!

one down, one lined

one down, one lined

I have had a good rest, and am ready to start the planning and marketing for the upcoming season-I am finding with organic seed you really have to get on it and order early or a lot of the varieties you want get sold out.  This is especially true for potatoes and cover crop seed.  I have ordered a couple of good looking farm books, and my new BCS tractor, and will probably order and build my first green/prophouse this month.

The garlic is up and says we are already on the downhill slide to spring.  The days are getting longer.  But for now, I am happy to see some snow.

winter garlic

winter garlic

Happy New Year, everyone!